Your empathy shows

Given the importance attached to the inference of intent in other disciplines, it is notable that no serious effort has been devoted to understanding the inference of intent in design. Instead, the user response literature typically conceives of users as rather unsophisticated readers of products: they are seen to read the product, but not to recognise that that product has been written. For example, users are reported as finding products attractive, easy to use and symbolically appropriate, but little mention is made of whether users believe that those products were intended to be regarded in such ways (see reviews by Creusen & Schoormans, 2005; Crilly, et al., 2004; Desmet & Hekkert, 2007). This is despite work in the philosophy of cognition (Dennett, 1987; Vaesen & van Amerongen, 2008) and developmental psychology (Bloom, 1996; Kelemen & Carey, 2007) that argues that people’s interpretations of designed objects involve some inference of the designers’ intentions. Even where design research does recognise the possibility that users will infer design intent, this work is primarily conceptual in nature and is relatively rare and underemphasised (for example, we must look to specific passages in Bonta, 1979, p. 227; Crilly, Good, Matravers, & Clarkson, 2008, pp. 440-442; Crilly, Maier, & Clarkson, 2008, p. 20; Kazmierczak, 2003, p. 5; Malkewitz, Wright, & Friestad, 2003, pp. 5-6; Van Rompay, 2008, p. 342).


Do Users Know What Designers Are Up To? Product Experience and the Inference of Persuasive Intentions Nathan Crilly

Most people don’t even know how to ask a question. Most of don’t see the root of a question is a quest.

https://vimeo.com/95257403

Richard Saul Wurman

Design Culture: It starts with strong design skills among all

A good read about The Myth of Apple design My favorite:

Apple Myth #1: Apple has the best designers… Not True!

“It’s actually the engineering culture, and the way the organization is structured to appreciate and support design. Everybody there is thinking about UX and design, not just the designers. And that’s what makes everything about the product so much better … much more than any individual designer or design team.”

I leave you with this…What does it mean to have a design culture and how can you create a culture where everyone feels comfortable thinking like a designer?

tinypmsmatch:

Pantone 143 color match. Ticonderoga #2 pencil. Never think that you’re too small to start a big idea (what I’m preaching to myself).

Some fun for you!

tinypmsmatch:

Pantone 143 color match. Ticonderoga #2 pencil. Never think that you’re too small to start a big idea (what I’m preaching to myself).

Some fun for you!

Reblogged from Tiny PMS Match

TV S.M.A.R.T.: Anytime, Anywhere - The Evolution Continues

Work I did with Labrador Agency in NYC. Love it!!